Paul Anthony Jones
The Accidental Dictionary: The Remarkable Twists and Turns of English Words
August 21, 2019 Comments.. 327
The Accidental Dictionary The Remarkable Twists and Turns of English Words Our everyday language is full of surprises its origins are stranger than you might think Any word might be knocked and buffeted subjected to twists and turns expansions and contractions happy and u
  • Title: The Accidental Dictionary: The Remarkable Twists and Turns of English Words
  • Author: Paul Anthony Jones
  • ISBN: 9781681775692
  • Page: 242
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Our everyday language is full of surprises its origins are stranger than you might think Any word might be knocked and buffeted, subjected to twists and turns, expansions and contractions, happy and unhappy accidents There are intriguing tales behind even the most familiar terms, and they can say as much about the present as they do the past.Busking, for instance, origiOur everyday language is full of surprises its origins are stranger than you might think Any word might be knocked and buffeted, subjected to twists and turns, expansions and contractions, happy and unhappy accidents There are intriguing tales behind even the most familiar terms, and they can say as much about the present as they do the past.Busking, for instance, originally meant piracy Grin meant to snarl A bimbo was a man nice meant ignorant glamor was magic, and a cupboard was a table Buxom used to mean obedient a cloud was a rock raunchy originally meant dirty.Focusing on one hundred surprising threads in the evolution of English, The Accidental Dictionary reveals the etymological origins and quirky developments that have led to the meanings we take for granted today It is a weird and wonderful journey into words.So, let s revel in its randomness and delight in its diversity our dictionary is indeed accidental.
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      Paul Anthony Jones

    1 Blog on “The Accidental Dictionary: The Remarkable Twists and Turns of English Words

    1. Arthur Graham says:

      As an armchair linguist, I ve always been fascinated by the often quite obscure origins of our everyday words, marveling at the ways in which seemingly unconnected terms spring from the same etymology, the ways in which seemingly connected terms spring from different etymologies, and the common misconceptions and the sheer amount of guesswork behind word origins In The Accidental Dictionary, Jones sets his focus on precisely this phenomena, tracing a selection of words from their origins in Lati [...]

    2. Paul says:

      Words are chameleons, they start out meaning one thing, and being spelt in a particular way, and before you know it the spelling has changed and they now mean the total opposite to what you thought In The Accidental Dictionary, Paul Anthony Jones has taken 100 words that almost everyone would know or be familiar with, and peel back the layers of history behind each word to revel the startlingly different meanings that they had originally.In this strange and wonderful journey we will discover how [...]

    3. Paul says:

      The Accidental Dictionary A surprising history of some of our words.Paul Anthony Jones has once again written a book that tells us a surprising history of some well known words in the English language He is already known as an expert etymologist and blogger on the English language and published widely on various books on the English language which have always been interesting and highly readable The Accidental Dictionary is going to be another book that you will enjoy dipping in and out of, and [...]

    4. Kate says:

      I never thought I would see the day that I would be reviewing a dictionary Dictionaries are books that live on the shelf, usually forgotten about and only ever used to win a game of scrabble or to settle an argument over the spelling or meaning of a word With the advancements in modern technology, we no longer need to know how to spell, we have gadgetry that does that for us be it smartphones, computers etc But this dictionary is different, instead of the ubiquitous aardvark at the beginning, we [...]

    5. Joshua says:

      History is the discourse about the events of the past, and alongside etymology there is no other study that probes into the way language and society changes The Accidental Dictionary then is for any reader who can and does appreciate the way our language alters over time, and how culture can both influence and be influenced by said language Paul Anthony Jones has written an approachable, wonderful book that allows the reader to dig, or even simply dip their toe, into the vast network of language [...]

    6. Dee Eisel says:

      It took me a few days to read this, in part because of work being really intense and health trying to outdo work Nevertheless, it s a quick and fun read and I adored it It s not for children, but language liking teens and adults will have a great time with it Jones takes a selection of common words in everyday use and shows how they not only don t mean what they originally meant, but some mean the exact opposite and some have less than nothing to do with their original meaning While those who ha [...]

    7. Erika Schaffer says:

      Unfortunately, this book was not very interesting to me I thought that many of the words chosen lacked any surprise or unusual factor I also thought many of the paragraph descriptions could have been shortened to 1 2 sentences I did not read it all and only read words that seemed to have a unusual back story I skipped things like cupboard originally meant table as that seems pretty obvious Other I skipped inmate, ostracism, and raunchy.

    8. Ron says:

      A pleasant enough little book about oddball etymology the concept is that the current meaning of many words has strayed far from the meaning they had when they first entered the language Clue spelled clew, originally meant ball of string when pencil entered the language, users of the word meant what we would calla paintbrush, and so on A good book for bedtime reading short entries, interesting enough information, clearly written, non taxing, and easy to put down as eyes got heavy.I won t remembe [...]

    9. Nancy says:

      This was a solidly OK book I thought I d be interested in etymology maybe I didn t care about the words picked, or I haven t been in the right mood, or something but I read a few and then skimmed through the rest I think this would be great as a coffee table book, but I ll be returning it to the library and probably not thinking about it again.

    10. Nick Bateman says:

      A lovely mixed back of etymological oddities Fun to dip into fo short, sharp blasts of word origins Most of which I have in turn been boring my class with, the morning after having read Recommended for anyone interested in how the English language evolves.

    11. Michelle Olms says:

      Great book

    12. Jo Barton says:

      My love of words has lasted throughout the whole of my life I enjoy reading a good list, and to have a fascinating plethora of words all contained in one sparkly volume has been a real delight The Accidental Dictionary focuses on the etymological origins of 100 words that are in common usage but whose meanings were once very different to what we know today If you want to flip through the book at whim, which is what I did, then a really good content list allows you to choose at random the hidden [...]

    13. Dane Cobain says:

      This book s an interesting one On the one hand, I learned a lot about the origins of a number of different words, but on the other, it started to get repetitive Personally, I think it was just the right length, but you have to bear in mind that not everyone loves words as much as me.But then, I ve read the Oxford English Dictionary, and it seems to me that reading this is much fun, and that it s also likely to teach you along the way What was interesting to me was that so many of the words tha [...]

    14. Ellen Forkin says:

      I relished this book, lots of little snippets of trivia and history hidden in our everyday language I read this all the way through consecutively, and although the words chapters do follow nicely from one to the other, you could easily dip into this book every now and again if suddenly you wondered about the origin of penguin or zombie Despite being a book on etymology, it reads smoothly, and sometimes conversationally you don t need any prior knowledge on words to enjoy it Bring onThe Accidenta [...]

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